Drilling Through the Caps

March 23, 2011 – 3:12 pm

With news about AT&T’s announcement last week that they will be imposing caps on their ADSL and U-Verse VDSL customers, we have received a lot of inquiries about whether or not this will affect Sonic.net customers, and whether we plan to follow the lead of Comcast and AT&T. We are also being asked why AT&T is imposing caps, and about the $10 per 50GB for overage charges. Is it congestion, pricing fairness, or just more revenue?

To be clear, Sonic.net has no plans to impose usage caps on our customers.

Our DSL customers are in two categories: those served on the AT&T ADSL1 DSLAMs via our wholesale line sharing relationship with AT&T, and those on our own equipment which serves the Fusion ADSL2+ Broadband & Phone platform. On our own Fusion network, we have absolute control over policies such as usage caps or bandwidth management.

For our customers on the AT&T wholesale network, we have a contractual relationship with AT&T to deliver broadband service to our mutual customers. I do not expect any near term changes to the policies and terms of that relationship.

In Canada, incumbent telephone companies such as Bell Canada have been working to lobby for legislation that would require all ISPs to charge for usage, including those who obtain wholesale access from Bell Canada. This usage based billing (UBB) legislation has become a political hot potato, with sites like stopusagebasedbilling.com and stopthecap.com carrying the fight.

As for the reasons for the push for usage based billing, Bell Canada CEO George Cope has said, “…as we see a growth in video usage on the internet, making sure we’re monetizing that for our shareholders through the bandwidth usage charges”.

DSLReports.com concludes that the caps that Comcast imposes and which AT&T is launching are “solely designed to cash in on Internet video – while protecting TV revenues.”

This is okay, it is clear, and it is reasonable that Comcast and AT&T should push customers toward their television services.

But here at Sonic.net, we have a different business model. If you like it, be sure to check for Fusion availability in your area.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_WCKZPM46I67KOLSOGQKFSDMBYQ Wen S M

    Dane,
    Glad to see your article here. I switch to Sonic because there is no cap. I used AT&T for 11 years, and I am making a switch today. Imposing a 2nd cap is very unreasonable even though AT&T reduces the price of the DSL to $19.95.

    I hope Sonic won’t get buyout by AT&T, just like Facebook rejects the buyout from Microsoft and Google. Now, they are one of the giant.

  • Brian

    Well done. That’s why I am a lifelong Sonic customer.

  • Brian

    Well done. That’s why I am a lifelong Sonic customer.

  • Akmal

    Its because of decisions like this that I ditched AT&T and have been with Sonic for all these years.

    I only wish Fusion was available in Novato as I would like to completely be off any dependance on AT&T.

  • Anonymous

    Capping is a disgrace. It’s an underhanded way for companies to avoid investing in infrastructure. Why upgrade when you can just charge more? I’m hoping this trend will die out in the US. We’ve seen it rear it’s ugly head before and a free market killed it. As long as the market remains unencumbered by regulations like the one Bell Canada is trying to pull I think we’ll be fine as long as there’s competition.

  • http://stevenmaturin.myopenid.com/ Your Name

    I thought that getting Fusion would completely break me free of anything to do with AT&T. Then they announced they’re buying T-Mobile :-(

    Sonic is one of the very few companies I can unreservedly recommend and I hope it stays that way. Like Wen I would hate to see a buyout but it’s always a risk (I used to have the same positive feelings towards Speakeasy, then they were bought out by Best Buy, lost all the properties that attracted me to them, and promptly failed under the new regime – see http://gigaom.com/2010/06/10/speakeasy-covad/ ).

  • http://stevenmaturin.myopenid.com/ Your Name

    I thought that getting Fusion would completely break me free of anything to do with AT&T. Then they announced they’re buying T-Mobile :-(

    Sonic is one of the very few companies I can unreservedly recommend and I hope it stays that way. Like Wen I would hate to see a buyout but it’s always a risk (I used to have the same positive feelings towards Speakeasy, then they were bought out by Best Buy, lost all the properties that attracted me to them, and promptly failed under the new regime – see http://gigaom.com/2010/06/10/speakeasy-covad/ ).

  • http://stevenmaturin.myopenid.com/ Your Name

    I thought that getting Fusion would completely break me free of anything to do with AT&T. Then they announced they’re buying T-Mobile :-(

    Sonic is one of the very few companies I can unreservedly recommend and I hope it stays that way. Like Wen I would hate to see a buyout but it’s always a risk (I used to have the same positive feelings towards Speakeasy, then they were bought out by Best Buy, lost all the properties that attracted me to them, and promptly failed under the new regime – see http://gigaom.com/2010/06/10/speakeasy-covad/ ).

  • http://stevenmaturin.myopenid.com/ Your Name

    I thought that getting Fusion would completely break me free of anything to do with AT&T. Then they announced they’re buying T-Mobile :-(

    Sonic is one of the very few companies I can unreservedly recommend and I hope it stays that way. Like Wen I would hate to see a buyout but it’s always a risk (I used to have the same positive feelings towards Speakeasy, then they were bought out by Best Buy, lost all the properties that attracted me to them, and promptly failed under the new regime – see http://gigaom.com/2010/06/10/speakeasy-covad/ ).

  • http://stevenmaturin.myopenid.com/ Your Name

    I thought that getting Fusion would completely break me free of anything to do with AT&T. Then they announced they’re buying T-Mobile :-(

    Sonic is one of the very few companies I can unreservedly recommend and I hope it stays that way. Like Wen I would hate to see a buyout but it’s always a risk (I used to have the same positive feelings towards Speakeasy, then they were bought out by Best Buy, lost all the properties that attracted me to them, and promptly failed under the new regime – see http://gigaom.com/2010/06/10/speakeasy-covad/ ).

  • http://profiles.google.com/caitlin.childs Caitlin Childs

    This is exactly why I love Sonic.net, why is it so hard to find an ISP that actually cares about customer service and loyalty? Sonic’s growth is proof that customers really do care about those things. Thanks Sonic!

  • http://twitter.com/jayhipps Jay Hipps

    If anyone is interested in UBB and the situation in Canada, there’s a journalist in Toronto named Jesse Brown who has done some great work in that area. You can find him at http://www.tvo.org/searchengine or look for his podcast, “Search Engine,” on iTunes.

  • Chris

    This is why I love and continue to recommend you guys. I give you money and no trouble, you give me packets and no trouble.

  • http://www.facebook.com/thefurman Alex Furman

    This is exactly why I went with Sonic as my ISP and why I’m recommending it to all of my friends.

  • http://www.facebook.com/thefurman Alex Furman

    This is exactly why I went with Sonic as my ISP and why I’m recommending it to all of my friends.

  • John

    As every one who’s been following these issues knows, AT & T and Verizon have banded together to control internet pricing and to lock their customers into a pay to play scheme to further enrich their corporate masters. Do not expect the Obama administration to fight this. As a ten year more-than-satisfied customer of Sonic.net I urge everyone within Fusion range to flee the giants and join us here.

  • Al

    1. Sonic Customer Service outclasses anything that AT&T could only hope to provide.
    2. If only Fusion was available in my area, I would whole-heartedly sign up for it… (Hurry please)…
    3. This is how AT&T hopes t create loyalty by gouging their current Customers?!?!?
    4. I HATE AT&T….

  • Al

    1. Sonic Customer Service outclasses anything that AT&T could only hope to provide.
    2. If only Fusion was available in my area, I would whole-heartedly sign up for it… (Hurry please)…
    3. This is how AT&T hopes t create loyalty by gouging their current Customers?!?!?
    4. I HATE AT&T….

  • Bruce L.

    I found Sonic.net by pure accident and I’m glad I did. They are big enough to serve you and small enough to know you.

    Dane Jasper is totally engaged with his company and his customers. I mean, Dane and Sonic even invited Sonic subscribers to the opening of Tron Legacy (even though I couldn’t make it). How many ISP’s would actually do that? Probably just one, and it’s not Comcast.

    Sonic is being smart and NOT following suit regarding the data caps. If this keeps up, the big guys will lose lots of customers. Remember, people are paying for a service — not micro-management. Think about this: Hong Kong has fiber optic lines for 26 HKD.

    Food 4 thought.

  • Luk350

    That’s why i went to Sonic with all my family and friends for the past 8 years.
    Now i’m due for Fusion.
    Great job Dane!

  • Someone

    I am sooooo sick to death of Comcast and ATT’s gouging me. Every time I get their marketing “specials” in my mail box, I say thank God for Sonicnet. As a customer I couldn’t ask for better service and customer relations. Thank you!

  • Guest

    back home in Sweden i have 100/100 Mbit (uncapped) fiber for ~30 USD (which i can upgrade to full Gbit duplex). Sadly, in the US there are no such services in residential areas. However, SONIC is by far the best service i’ve seen in California. Kudos to CEO and the entire team for the excellent service!!

  • Guest

    back home in Sweden i have 100/100 Mbit (uncapped) fiber for ~30 USD (which i can upgrade to full Gbit duplex). Sadly, in the US there are no such services in residential areas. However, SONIC is by far the best service i’ve seen in California. Kudos to CEO and the entire team for the excellent service!!

  • Oversea23

    I’d really like to see a definitive statement, rather than “Sonic.net has no plans to impose usage caps.” Implicit after that phrase is, “at this time.”

  • http://profiles.google.com/rh.bayarea RH in SF

    I think this is a bit unfair. At a certain point Sonic.net could (POTENTIALLY– and that’s the big question– about their actual deal in buying and reselling bandwidth) become impacted too if they too, as a wholesale purchaser of bandwidth from AT&T, had outrageous news fees imposed upon them.

  • Santa Rosa

    Get it while the getting’s good. For all of the good things sonic.net provides me, I must forgive the semantics. I can’t expect sonic.net to know everything the future brings – a definitive statement would be a foolish business move. Thank you sonic.net for addressing the matter quickly!

  • Newmanc

    I saw something once where it has been sugggested to require UBB in the USA to combat piracy.

  • http://profiles.google.com/rh.bayarea RH in SF

    TRUE — I think for all of us, the word “DESPISE” is in the top 5 words that come to the tips of our tongues when we rifle through our mailboxes filtering out that incessant junk proclaiming their GREAT DEALS with tiny asterisks. I have a new sudden idea, but it is probably already taken: TinyAsterisk.com — whereby we nail the most outrageous bait & switch practices of the monopoly carriers in the USA. At top of list would be AT&T fighting neck and neck with Comcast. Both companies have such beautiful glossy happy people marketing campaigns, usually including the dog and grandma and cool teenager rocking out to itunes with obligatory VIDEO GAMES….

    All of which goes into massive overhead costs that are used as justification for enormous pricing which of course they would “rephrase as” VALUE PRICING.

    BUT — I would like to repost below what I posted to my twitter account in reply to this same thread posted on sonic.net’s twitter account on THIS BLOG POSTING, having to do with Sonic.net’s partial reliance on AT&T’s infrastructure for “last mile” delivery of their fusion service to customers. … But just to be clear, of all ISP’s I have had since 1990 (netcom.com) — in San Francisco alone including Covad.net, Concentric, IX or whatever that one was called, then AT&T, SONIC.net blows them all away in service reliability, customer support (LEVEL 1 phone knows their stuff!), etc. go Sonic!

  • Dan

    Thanks for staying real.

  • Nwilson

    Hey is that a Sonic Net gas meter? Please tell me you guys are going to sell gas soon, I would pay $1.279 per gallon.

    Regarding fusion ADSL; it rocks. After I signed up, I got my folks and my brother to sign up too. It is a solid service.

  • http://profiles.google.com/rh.bayarea RH in SF

    IMPORTANT QUESTION FOR SONIC.net CEO Dane Jasper:

    “LAST MILE” AT&T COPPER impairing maximum thruput in some areas with older infrastructure:

    I *Love* your fusion product & philosophy of NO THROTTLING: you get as fast as your lines support. For me, & those hampered by loop length, especially in the old neighboorhoods of San Francisco where the AT&T COPPER is old and not fiber optic cable, since Sonic.net uses AT&T twisted pairs as your “last mile” delivery system from AT&T central offices, where your own DSLAM equipment is, to our homes or offices, many of us, through no fault of our own other than the luck of the draw, max out at a mere 3Mbps — where 20 is “possible”….. And people across town or elsewhere pay the same exact amount as we do, and GET 20 Mbps because they have a shorter “loop length” to their central office, AND their area’s copper lines are delivered by a much newer AT&T wired phone network from central office to their homes, the question is:

    How many years out before sonic.net figures out some new method for “last mile” delivery so that WE TOO can enjoy hi-speed service?

    This is especially relevant because right now in SF, with T-Mobile’s HSPA+ service I have, I get 14Mbps downloads. With Tethering, even by paying addl fees for extended data usage, isn’t this a direct competition to you? What am I missing in the equation? I pay X amount to you to get 3 Mbps DSL, or I pax Y amount to T-Mobile to get 14 Mbps HSPA+ data transfer… It begs the question.. why have copper delivery to my home at all if OverTheAir can give me considerably faster speeds?

    Tell me what I am missing?

    ** OF COURSE all of this goes moot (A) if AT&T’s monopolistic acquisition is approved by Bush, I mean Obama’s Justice Department, and (B) AT&T either dismantles TMO’s network, or (C) immediately installs its caps and throttles.

    One hand giveth, the other taketh. Consumers never win. PLS REPLY

  • Shanbeau

    I LOVE Sonic and I’m happy to be able to support them once again. However, it is unfortunate that the limitations of ADSL2+ are such that I’d consider changing. I hate even considering the idea, but the reality is I am like so many other American consumers and I’ve become accustomed to my “gas guzzler”. I enjoy high speed Internet and ADSL technology just comes up short. Unfortunately, I live at the “end” of the ADSL2+ line and get marginally faster speeds than what I was getting with AT&T. It’s great that I also have unlimited nation wide calling included for much less than I was paying at AT&T. But still…..sometimes it really is just about the speed. If only Sonic was in the cable business!

  • Anonymous

    @RH,

    We’ve got a few approaches to try to address to the loop length and speed challenge. As you note, customers on longer loops can only maintain lower rates of speed, which may be inadequate.

    First, we are now optimizing customer loops using dynamic spectrum management software from ASSIA. Deployed today is DSM level 1, which optimizes loops for both speed and stability. This has been rolling out the last few weeks, and a pretty large chunk of customer circuits have been optimized.

    Second, we offer bonded two line service, and a couple weeks ago we reduced the price of this service in order to make it more reasonable. Now for an additional $30/mo, residential customers can get a second phone line and broadband at twice the speed. (For business sites the second line is $40.)

    Finally, we recognize that in the long term, copper just won’t be enough, and we are investing heavily in fiber to the premise. We have two major projects underway currently, both pilots to prove the concepts and determine the costs. As we learn from these, you can expect more and more roll-outs.

    Stick with us, we’re going places.

    -Dane Jasper

  • Anonymous

    @Shanbeau,

    You might consider the bonded two-line service. With our recent price reductions, it’s a better deal than ever.

    -Dane Jasper

  • http://profiles.google.com/rh.bayarea RH in SF

    Thank you so much. This is the kind of straight forward, substantive answer people really appreciate — and for which you and your company are known. btw is “Stick with us, we’re going places”® a service mark?

    If so, can’t blame you for hiring someone from AT&T marketing (okay, a joke)

    But that’s great to know you have fiber optic plans. For a city like San Francisco, that has got to be exceptionally expensive. So, I don’t expect the moon. I’m not even complaining. Your fusion DSL far better optimized the very same twisted pair lines running from the very same AT&T central office to my home and almost doubled the thruput despite the long loop length constraints. So I already know you guys do backflips with engineering and optimization.

    Keep up the good work.

    This is no big deal. I note you didn’t comment on the HSPA Over the air delivery. I was hoping you would because I know you and sonic.net as a whole do not throw out b.s. fear-based statements or distraction re-directs so as to not deal with an elephant in the room.

    Let me put it this way: The classic argument — forget or a moment whether it is now exactly relevant or true — between cable modem vs DSL is: PRO: “Wow! Cable Modem speeds are so much faster! They blow DSL out the water!” … CON: “Uhh yeah, theorectically maybe, but when all your neighbors are online at same time or everyone in your apartment building suddenly that bandwidth is diluted to a fraction of that speed and is way way slower than DSL when there is high demand”

    I would like to hear a similar PRO-CON argument that is realistic about the scenario I threw out. It doesn’t hurt you because most of your customers are getting the hugh thruput, and for me if given the choice, no way I want my internet coming from a tethered phone connection. But, would you please go front and center with this?

    Take the CURRENT T-mobile USA, before the BushAdministration Justice Department approves this AT&T acquisition of TMO USA:

    TELL ME THE FLAWS IN THE THEORETICAL ARGUMENT of:

    • ditching copper-based DSL all-together and

    • instead mapping out internet connectivity based on a tethered wireless OTA cellular data connection from mobile phone to a device, perhaps a router in my home — then feeding my whole network.

    • and paying the TMO surcharge for unlimited data

    I know one argument: Well, you’d have to have your phone with the router all the time. So, my answer would be, it would be a dedicated TMO account with minimal voiceplan, maximum data, just for this one purpose, and I have a spare phone already capable of relaying the signal (tethering) either wirelessly or via USB connection.

    PLEASE KNOCK THIS ARGUMENT DOWN SO I CAN FEEL GOOD. Thank you for your candor. Never had better service EVER than with SonicNet. I also like that I could open my back window, and throw a stone a long haul off my rooftop across the golden gate bridge and hit your building in Santa Rosa. Just to make sure you’re not snoozing on the job :)

  • Tony

    1. There might be cheaper deals or some faster connections to some people in some areas…and if your lucky, you might get (sometimes) what you think
    you are paying for…

    2. Experience with AT&T in any of its various current and past odious manifestations just has to be one of Sonic’s best customer recruiting tools.

  • Ross

    Hate is a strong word, a word that I reserve for the likes of ATT and Comcast. Thanks, Sonic.net, I’ve been with you since almost the beginning and will never go anywhere else. Now all you have to do is get Fusion in my neighborhood and my life would be complete. :-)

  • Oversea23

    Guys, don’t read more into what I said than… what I said ;) I do understand why a definitive statement isn’t necessarily practical or likely. There were actually no complaints or judgements attached. Nonetheless, if Sonic.net ever do impose caps, you can bet a good deal of the people fawning over them right now (and they do deserve it– I am happy with them too) will be up in arms feeling betrayed because they read that statement as a promise in perpetuity. Just keepin’ it real, as they say ;P

  • Anonymous

    They say, “never paint yourself into a corner”, and I will admit that
    I selected the wording of that phrase to give me wiggle room if things
    should change in the future. I hope that never occurs, but nothing’s
    certain in any business.

    -Dane

  • Pingback: Netflix Canada Announces New Bandwidth Management Settings For Capped Users | In Depth With Tech

  • Guest

    I didn’t realize Sweden had that kind of service! BTW – if you are interested, the Swedish students at SRJC will be giving their presentation on 4/4 at 7pm in Newman :)

  • Newmanc

    When will Fusion eventually be available with multiple IP addresses? I cannot put a second NIC card into the machine I use as my network server (no PCI slot in the machine), so I cannot use Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, so I would have to wait until multiple IP service was available on Fusion.

  • Anonymous

    Today we offer Fusion with either a dynamic IP, or with eight static
    IPs. You can find details on this on the sales page for the product,
    under the Broadband heading at the top.

    -Dane

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_O3DHKMIXMCWOW2VXOYPK5IYVFY Smooth Criminal

    I currently have the old plan which is $40 and the new 20Mb plan is the same price with phone service. I asked Sonic if I could get the 20Mb without the phone service since I already have a VoIP. I was told that I had to get the new plan in order to get the 20Mb. I am currently getting less than 3Mbps and was told that my line could supports up to 5Mbps. I don’t think I want to pay the extra $10 in taxes to get the extra 2Mbps.

  • Anonymous

    @Smooth_Criminal,

    Yes, your existing service is grandfathered, so you can stay at that
    rate and service if you’d prefer! Keep the voice option in mind, if
    you want to move to the current Fusion Broadband + Phone product, we’d
    be happy to set that up whenever you are ready.

    -Dane

  • Newmanc

    When you look at it though, AT&T’s charges for overages is acutally lower than other usage-based plans. $10 for every 50GB translates to 20 cents per gigabyte,, far less than the $1/gigabyte on Time Warner or $1.15/gigabyte with Comcast.

    At 20 cents/gigabyte overage costs, I could see AT&T pulling customers away from Time Warner and Comcast, especially considering that U-verse has a 250GB cap, just like Comcast does.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_O3DHKMIXMCWOW2VXOYPK5IYVFY Smooth Criminal

    I don’t understand. Can’t Sonic just increase my bandwidth to 5Mbps+?

  • Anonymous

    @Smooth_Criminal, yes, if you opt in to the new product, which is uncapped and unlimited voice and data, $39.95 plus the voice taxes. Contact support at 707-547-3400 to kick this off.

    -Dane

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_FMGPEHB6CS3CYBZ6JUTUFOJ5BY Dean

    The wording in the remarks “mutual customers” and no changes doesn’t free me of the notion that Sonic is providing service under the capped AT&T policy. The only facet remaining was whether they lose that wholesale pricing, and not whether Sonic was providing uncapped service still.
    I would have preferred the straight; We are not capping AT&T wholesale sub-provision at this time.

  • Anonymous

    By “mutual customers”, I mean that in reference to our customers who
    use the AT&T line-shared product, they are both customers of AT&T for
    their voice service, and Sonic.net for their data service. Our
    wholesale access to the DSLAMs does not include any caps at this time.
    When renewal time comes up, who knows, but that’s a long way away.

    For our own DSLAM facilities (the Fusion network), we have unilateral
    control over policy.

    -Dane

  • Oversea23

    Right on, Dane. Appreciate your candor :)

  • Kalli

    Is fusion available in the Ukiah area?

  • Anonymous

    26 Hong Kong dollars = 3.34 US$

  • Anonymous

    The price is actually about about $26 US dollars, 199 HKD.

    -Dane

  • Anonymous

    Still a great deal. Its a shame that this country lags so far behind when
    it comes to broadband.

  • Happy Sonic Customer

    I live 7,300 feet from the switch in an old San Rafael neighborhood and have always had trouble on “last Mile” lines. (Noise, Rf, momentary service interruptions and excessive static during damp or wet weather. Dozens of 611 calls have always blamed inside wiring which I know from running intensive tests is clean.

    I signed up for Fusion about a month ago, fantastic speed 60% greater than Att premium, the who shot is less than half the Att bill. When the noise and crap cropped up again I called Sonic’s fantastic Tech Support and taking the modem to the Mpoe we proved it was a “last mile” problem. Sonic put in a trouble ticket with telco and within a day, miraculously the lines were clean and no problems. Telco tech reported nothing wrong. (Expletive deleted). Sonic is an example of the best in American Business and I am proud to a “member”.

  • Happy Sonic Customer

    I live 7,300 feet from the switch in an old San Rafael neighborhood and have always had trouble on “last Mile” lines. (Noise, Rf, momentary service interruptions and excessive static during damp or wet weather. Dozens of 611 calls have always blamed inside wiring which I know from running intensive tests is clean.

    I signed up for Fusion about a month ago, fantastic speed 60% greater than Att premium, the who shot is less than half the Att bill. When the noise and crap cropped up again I called Sonic’s fantastic Tech Support and taking the modem to the Mpoe we proved it was a “last mile” problem. Sonic put in a trouble ticket with telco and within a day, miraculously the lines were clean and no problems. Telco tech reported nothing wrong. (Expletive deleted). Sonic is an example of the best in American Business and I am proud to a “member”.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=546609588 Steven Scharf

    I’ve told a lot of people about Sonic Fusion, and sometimes they act as if I’m making the whole thing up. They don’t believe that they can get landline service from anyone but AT&T, they don’t understand that they should be using VPN at public hot spots (and that Sonic includes VPN termination at no extra charge while AT&T and Comcast don’t offer it at all to residential customers), they don’t believe that Fusion offers DSL as fast as their line can handle, and they are so used to abysmal customer support from AT&T that they don’t believe that there could possibly be anything different. I’s almost as if they enjoy paying more money for poorer service.

  • Anonymous

    Please do your best to convince them. =)

    -Dane

  • ConcordBoy

    Oh the humanity. Seems I have a physical cap. Finally Fusion is available at the Concord CO and I’m freakin’ 12k feet away. Well by PacBell’s standard (or whatever they call themselves this decade), I’m in an older 40s house where the wires run the LONG way, as the crow flies I’m 1 mile away from the CO.
    I’ve been a Sonic.Net customer off and on since 2002. At business, at parents, now on my own. Currently have astound because of the roommates. Can’t really share a 1.5Mb/s ADSL line effectively. Dane has alway run a great company. Keep up the great work! I hope to work at Sonic.Net soon when I graduate college!

  • ConcordBoy

    Oh the humanity. Seems I have a physical cap. Finally Fusion is available at the Concord CO and I’m freakin’ 12k feet away. Well by PacBell’s standard (or whatever they call themselves this decade), I’m in an older 40s house where the wires run the LONG way, as the crow flies I’m 1 mile away from the CO.
    I’ve been a Sonic.Net customer off and on since 2002. At business, at parents, now on my own. Currently have astound because of the roommates. Can’t really share a 1.5Mb/s ADSL line effectively. Dane has alway run a great company. Keep up the great work! I hope to work at Sonic.Net soon when I graduate college!

  • Anonymous

    @Newmanc: could one of those simple home “broadband router” (which does the same and more as MS ISC) work for you? Some DSL modems integrate this functionality, so you might not even need a separate box.
    Or a USB network adapter?

  • Anonymous

    Fusion is available with eight static IPs today. The details are in the Broadband tab of the sale page, and the static IP option is offered during signup.

    -Dane

  • Anonymous

    Yes, thank you Dane, you already said this. Your company unfortunately charges 20 or 40$ per month for static IPs — a whooping 240$ or 480$ each year. Ouch.

    Please contrast this with a cheap home router, e.g. a one-time 12$:
    http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=RT514C-PB&cat=NET

    Or a USB network adapter, 9$:
    http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=HE-130R&cat=NET

  • Anonymous

    You can use a router with dynamic IPs – matter of fact, the four-port
    ZTE router we sell includes four Ethernet ports and Wi-Fi, and offers
    NAT, so you can have multiple PCs behind your single dynamic IP.

    You’d generally want static IPs for things like hosting of servers,
    games, VPN access, etc. I’ll concede that currently our static IP
    pricing is pretty high, and I think that’s something you will see us
    begin to offer other options in future on.

    -Dane

  • A Desperate Potential Customer

    Please! Please! expand your service just a little bit in Riverside California. I live in a good sized apartment complex with a lot of angry DSL customers who have been hit by Captain Caps’ disgraceful capping policy. In my case, it’s not that I’m going over the cap, since I have virtually stopped using Netflix and cut down on Youtube to avoid being smacked by the caps, but I’m sure all the people in the complex would love to be able to not worry about the caps and actually enjoy what they are paying for. This complex is less than a mile away from Fusion availability, and I’m sure if you make it available in this part of town, customers of Captain Caps will flock to you. I want to be able to watch Netflix again, and maybe rent i-tunes movies once in a while without worrying about double paying for the products, first to the product providers and then to Captain Caps just for the privilege of being able to spend my money on content. Please cross that last mile….please…..S.O.S….

  • Anonymous

    Dear Desperate,

    Fusion cannot be made to go further than it does. The limitation is fixed. Sorry! This is why we are working toward Fiber, because it basically eliminates distance and speed limits in practice.

    -Dane

  • Hank

    ATnT is putting something called “Project Lightspeed” into our neighborhood — does this make any difference to what Sonic can push through to us?

  • Edrang

    I love Soinc, I have already convinced  some of my freinds to chnge to Sonic

  • Anonymous

    I am out of the office until Tuesday July 12th.

    In my absence, please contact the following staff for assistance:

    Support and Customer Service, Eli Caul, eli.caul@corp.sonic.net
    Accounting: Nicki Schneider, nicki@corp.sonic.net
    Enterprise Sales: Mark Loher, mloher@corp.sonic.net
    Systems administration: Kelsey Cummings, kgc@corp.sonic.net
    Network admin and telco/carrier: Nathan Patrick, npatrick@corp.sonic.net
    HR and General administration, Jen Codarre, jen@corp.sonic.net

    Everyone can also be reached at 707-522-1000.

    Thank you!


    Dane Jasper Sonic.net, Inc.
    (707)522-1000 http://www.sonic.net/
    mailto:dane@corp.sonic.net

  • Mjr77

    Great job, great service, keep up the great work!

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  • http://iamdavie.com/juniper-credit-card/ juniper credit card

    AT&T is a carrier, right? And Verizon is a mobile company?

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  • Bill Pay

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  • http://twitter.com/WillieFDiazSF William Diaz ✔

    Both AT&T and Verizon are land-line telephone carriers, internet service providers, television service providers and wireless telephone/data carriers.
    At the end of the day, both of them are a duopoly, and without regulation, as well as independent companies like Sonic that are stepping in and providing better services (even if its only phone and internet for now) and keeping the bigger companies in check, prices lower, and open lines. Without them, we may still be paying $50 a month for 56K Dial Up Tpe Internet.

  • http://twitter.com/WillieFDiazSF William Diaz ✔

    Project Lightspeed is the AT&T name for fiber-to-the-home FTTH. Not all areas will be getting this, and even more so is that not all areas will be getting Fiber To The Home, but rather to the Premises, Block (etc).

    This is to expand their U-Verse offering. It is a rather expensive deployment that due to AT&T limiting themselves, and having no incentive to compete in their markets against any other Fiber company (except in areas Sonic or Verizon FiOS services) I dont see many areas expanding with this technology. Not that it matters anyway, U-Verse is still limited, while the lines that carry it do NOT have the limits they make consumers think.

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